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François Couperin was born on 10 November 1668 in Paris

francois-couperin-grangerFrançois Couperin was a French Baroque composer, organist and harpsichordist. Couperin introduced Corelli’s trio sonata form to France. In which he blended the Italian and French styles of music in a set of pieces which he called Les goûts réunis (“Styles Reunited”). His most famous book, L’art de toucher le clavecin “The Art of Harpsichord Playing” published in 1716, contains suggestions for fingerings, touch, ornamentation and other features of keyboard technique. Couperin’s four volumes of harpsichord music, published in Paris in 1713, 1717, 1722, and 1730, contain over 230 individual pieces, which can be played on solo harpsichord or performed as small chamber works. These pieces were not grouped into suites, as was the common practice, but ordres, which were Couperin’s own version of suites containing traditional dances as well as descriptive pieces. The first and last pieces in an ordre were of the same tonality, but the middle pieces could be in other closely related tonalities. These volumes were loved by Johann Sebastian Bach and, much later, Richard Strauss, as well as Maurice Ravel who memorialized their composer with Le tombeau de Couperin (Couperin’s Memorial).

(Magyar) Kocsis Zoltánra emlékezünk

Sorry, this entry is only available in Hungarian.

Founder of the Hungarian Philharmonic Society, Ferenc Erkel

erkel-ferencFerenc Erkel was born on 7th November in 1810. He became a leading figure in establishing the Hungarian national music and opera genre and its supporting cultural institutions. Erkel was director of the newly opened Hungarian Theatre in 1837. His first historical opera, Mária Bátori was performed in 1840, to be followed by László Hunyadi in 1844. He won the national anthem composition with his music for Kölcsey’s Hymn. In 1853 he founded the Hungarian Philharmonic Society. After the failure of the Hungarian war of independence he did not produce any major works until his epic opera Bánk bán in 1861. In 1875 he became the director and piano teacher of the newly founded Academy of Music. He died on 15th June in 1893 at the age of 83.

Five scary pieces of classical music

Home_Alone_Boy1-620x369Composers from Bach to Sibelius have produced pieces that can shake you to your bones better than any movie or ghost story. Here we take a look at a small selection…and don’t say we didn’t warn you!

Modest Mussorgsky, Night on the Bare Mountain

This work was never performed during Mussorgsky’s lifetime, but it has since established itself as one of the most well known when it comes to spreading a sense of fear among an audience.

Franz Liszt, Totentanz

Maybe those rumours about Liszt’s bargain with the devil really were on to something. At least after listening to this spooky death dance you’d be forgiven for thinking so.

Hector Berlioz: Witch’s Sabbath

Nothing can quite compare to the terrifying irregularity and unexpected shocks that emerge in the fifth movement of the Symphonie Fantastique. The entire piece was written by Berlioz about an artist and his dreams while he is drugged. The fifth movement depicts a series of visions he has.

György Ligeti, Volumina

Ligeti’s experimental music is perfect for terrifying the life out of you or your neighbours.

Arnold Schönberg: Erwartung

The one act opera is written for solo soprano and follows a woman as she walks through the woods at night in search of her lover, who she believes is dead.

Alexander Borodin the hobby composer

Alexander_BorodinBorodin (1833–1887) worked as a scientist and composed as a hobby. His most famous work is his symphonic picture, In the Steppes of Central Asia, which takes his unique Oriental style to unprecedented levels of poetic sensitivity. Borodin was one of the most naturally gifted of all Russian composers, yet his principal vocation was as a brilliant research chemist and lecturer. He was brought up and tutored by his devoted mother and female friends and relations. When Borodin set to work on his First Symphony, he had next to no experience in handling large-scale forms and orchestration, and it took him five years to complete. At the same time Borodin was also fulfilling his duties as Professor at the Medio-Surgical Academy, and he helped to set up the first medical courses for women in Russia. With only a couple of major works behind him, word got out of Russia of Borodin’s extraordinary talent, and Franz Liszt took the burgeoning composer under his wing, conducting his music whenever he could. Borodin was the illegitimate son of Prince Luka Spanovich Gedianov, an elderly nobleman, and the beautiful and intelligent 24-year-old Avdotya Konstantinova Antonova. To save any public embarrassment, he was registered under the name of one of the Prince’s serfs, Pofiry Borodin.

Who was Louis Vierne?

viernel_wanamakeraudThe French composer, Louis Vierne (1870-1937), wrote six symphonies as large-scale concert works for pipe organ. Vierne was born with congenital cataracts, leaving him nearly blind. That did not stop his gift for music though and he was picking out melodies on the piano by the age of two. He studied with French composer-organists César Franck and Charles-Marie Widor. Vierne accepted the organist position at Notre-Dame in 1900 and remained in that post until his death in 1937. The highs and lows of his personal and professional life were expressed in his symphonies. Despite these hardships, he had a deep faith. Many of his vocal works were religious but not all of them. His 1,750th recital took place on June 2, 1937, at Notre-Dame. He was almost finished with the performance when he collapsed from a heart attack and died. The only part of the program that remained was for him to play improvisations based on themes submitted to him. He had read the first theme in Braille and had selected the stops when he suddenly fell off the bench. His wish had come true, that when he died, he wanted it to be at the cathedral’s great organ console.

A versatile composer

williams_vaughanRalph Vaughan Williams (1872–1958) is one of the most important composers of the 20th century.  Drawing on the influences of English folk song and Tudor polyphony, Williams succeeded at reviving British music during a career that spanned over six decades. Williams’ interest in music began at an early age, when in addition to playing the violin, viola, piano and organ he became increasingly interested in composition. Williams’ early work was influenced by his dissatisfaction with the English music scene. He decided to draw on native resources, rather than turning to foreign influences, therefore English folksong became a pivotal part of his composition. At the age of 70, Williams moved into a new genre of film music. He wrote the music for Scott of the Antarctica in 1948, from which he developed his Symphonia Antartica. Williams died peacefully in August 1958 and his ashes were placed by the grave of Henry Purcell in Westminster Abbey. By the end of his life, Vaughan Williams had composed in almost every genre, having written nine symphonies, six operas, a ballet and a variety of hymn tunes and scores for the stage and screen.

Five scary pieces of classical music just in time for Halloween

Composers from Bach to Sibelius have produced pieces that can shake you to your bones better than any movie or ghost story. Here we take a look at a small selection…and don’t say we didn’t warn you!

Modest Mussorgsky, Night on the Bare Mountain

This work was never performed during Mussorgsky’s lifetime, but it has since established itself as one of the most well known when it comes to spreading a sense of fear among an audience.

Franz Liszt, Totentanz

Maybe those rumours about Liszt’s bargain with the devil really were on to something. At least after listening to this spooky death dance you’d be forgiven for thinking so.

Hector Berlioz: Witch’s Sabbath

Nothing can quite compare to the terrifying irregularity and unexpected shocks that emerge in the fifth movement of the Symphonie Fantastique. The entire piece was written by Berlioz about an artist and his dreams while he is drugged. The fifth movement depicts a series of visions he has.

György Ligeti, Volumina

Ligeti’s experimental music is perfect for terrifying the life out of you or your neighbours.

Arnold Schönberg: Erwartung

The one act opera is written for solo soprano and follows a woman as she walks through the woods at night in search of her lover, who she believes is dead.

Who was Louis Vierne?

viernel_wanamakeraudThe French composer, Louis Vierne (1870-1937), wrote six symphonies as large-scale concert works for pipe organ. Vierne was born with congenital cataracts, leaving him nearly blind. That did not stop his gift for music though and he was picking out melodies on the piano by the age of two. He studied with French composer-organists César Franck and Charles-Marie Widor. Vierne accepted the organist position at Notre-Dame in 1900 and remained in that post until his death in 1937. The highs and lows of his personal and professional life were expressed in his symphonies. Despite these hardships, he had a deep faith. Many of his vocal works were religious but not all of them. His 1,750th recital took place on June 2, 1937, at Notre-Dame. He was almost finished with the performance when he collapsed from a heart attack and died. The only part of the program that remained was for him to play improvisations based on themes submitted to him. He had read the first theme in Braille and had selected the stops when he suddenly fell off the bench. His wish had come true, that when he died, he wanted it to be at the cathedral’s great organ console.

A Bach Toccata and Fugue as Halloween

bachsmlOne of the most famous pieces of music associated with Halloween and horror films is Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565 by J. S. Bach. This organ composition fits in with a spooky atmosphere as it seems to warn curious onlookers about creaking boards and ghosts. The history of the work adds to possible mystery because it wasn’t published until almost 100 years after it was written. Its publication in 1833 was made possible through the persistence of composer Felix Mendelssohn who was also the first to perform it in concert. Speculation later arose as to whether or not Bach wrote this work including the theory that was it perhaps written by one of his contemporaries who was acquainted with the family. Nevertheless, it remains credited to Bach. The work was used in several horror films and to underscore villains but the most well-known was the 1940 Disney animated motion picture, Fantasia. Leopold Stokowski had previously arranged it for the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1927. The Philadelphia Orchestra performed the soundtrack, conducted by Stokowski, which included the orchestral arrangement of this work. Several arrangements for symphony orchestra, as well as small ensemble and solo instruments, followed the Stokowski version.

Az új adatvédelmi tájékoztató ITT elérhető. A honlap további használatához a sütik használatát el kell fogadni. További információ

A süti beállítások ennél a honlapnál engedélyezett a legjobb felhasználói élmény érdekében. Amennyiben a beállítás változtatása nélkül kerül sor a honlap használatára, vagy az "Elfogadás" gombra történik kattintás, azzal a felhasználó elfogadja a sütik használatát.

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